The Clobbering Cardinals | Disciples of Uecker

Disciples of Uecker

We'd like to go to the Playoffs, that would be cool.

On Friday night, the Brewers exploded for a six run lead over the Cardinals. Unfortunately, the Cardinals clobbered four home runs to erase the deficit and eventually win, 7-6. After the Brewers’ fast start, the loss was unexpected, to say the least. Even more so because of how the Cardinals did it.

Coming into Friday’s game, the Cardinals had hit a total of 55 home runs, tied with the Kansas City Royals for the fewest in all of baseball. For a little perspective, the Brewers entered Friday’s game having already smacked 93 HR.  The Cardinals’ 55 HR spread across 93 games means that the team averaged 0.59 HR/G. If that home run rate was sustained for an entire season, the Cardinals would be on pace to hit 96 HR.

So how low of a HR number is that? Since 2008, here are the only teams that have hit fewer than 100 HR in a season –

Team Year HRs
Padres 2011 91
Giants 2008 94
Marlins 2013 95
Astros 2011 95
Mets 2009 95

No Brewers team has hit fewer than 100 HR in a season since 1994, but that 1994 team only played 115 games because of the strike. If eliminating strike-shortened seasons (1994, 1981, and 1972), then only three Brewers teams have ever hit fewer than 100 HR in a season –

Year HRs
1992 82
1976 88
1984 96

Yet, because of Friday’s four HR game, the Cardinals’ were able to pad their HR/G ratio to 0.63. That rate maintained over 162 games would produce 102 HR.

But don’t think that the Cardinals HR binge against the Brewers was a fluke. Cardinals hitters have crushed Brewers pitchers this year. It just doesn’t feel that way for Brewers fans. The numbers prove it. Here’s the Cardinals’ heat map of their season slugging percentage (.372 SLG) prior to Sunday’s game.

That red flare, right down the heart of the plate, equates to a team .561 SLG on pitches in that zone. Now check out the Cardinals slugging percentage (.454 SLG) vs the Brewers this season.


There’s more red than blue here. That’s not a good thing. And the zone right down the heart of the plate? Yeah, the Cardinals are slugging .895 vs the Brewers on pitches in that part of the zone.

Simply, the Cardinals go HR crazy against the Crew. In fact, the Pirates are the only other team to have allowed the Cardinals to hit more than four HR off them this entire season. Again, the Cardinals smacked four HR against the Brewers on Friday night alone.  This season, the Cardinals HR% against the Brewers is higher than against any other team. In fact, it’s not even close.

Team HR PA HR%
Brewers 15 368 4.08%
Rockies 4 121 3.31%
Marlins 3 111 2.70%
Blue Jays 3 118 2.54%
Pirates 10 471 2.12%
DBacks 2 123 1.63%
Nationals 4 250 1.60%
Yankees 2 128 1.56%
Dodgers 2 137 1.46%
Rays 1 74 1.35%
Royals 2 158 1.27%
Giants 3 251 1.20%
Reds 4 338 1.18%
Mets 2 252 0.79%
Cubs 2 355 0.56%
Braves 1 223 0.45%
Phillies O 137 0.00%

As a team, the Cardinals have managed to hit 60 HR across 3,615 PA this season for a 1.7 HR%. That’s below the league’s team average of 2.3 HR%. Yet, the Brewers are giving up bombs to the Cardinals at 4.08 HR% — almost two and a half times more often than the rest of the league.

In 2013, the Cardinals batted for a stratospheric .330 AVG with RISP. That number has dropped to a .251 AVG with RISP in 2014. With ten games left between the Brewers and Cardinals, it will be important for the Crew to limit the long ball and make the Cardinals string hits together to score. If they can do that, Brewers fans should expect better results against the Cardinals in the second half.

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Comments

Tell us what do you think.

  1. Mark Thomas says: July 15, 2014

    You really left us hanging with this story. Any reason WHY the Cardinals have hit so many home runs against the Brewers? What is every other pitching staff in the league doing so well against the Cardinals that the Brewers can’t seem to do? Our pitching is NOT that bad — there’s no reason for this. Is it just bad luck, low sample size, mental, or something else? There has to be an explanation for it.

    • Evan (Maryland) says: July 15, 2014

      Our pitching is that bad when it comes to playing the Cardinals. Watching the pitches it’s not like they are hitting extraordinary pitches that are in good spots. Your stomach cringes when the ball is left up and over the plate only to be smacked out. Good hitters don’t waste that pitch.

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